Time Well Spent

You wouldn't be here otherwise ...
Clear view to Katahdin #notiffy #butwhenney

Clear view to Katahdin #notiffy #butwhenney

hamburgerwithtea:

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

fun fact, at the ground of Alnwick Castle some scenes of Harry Potter were shot (such as the first lession of flyin and all)

(Source: bregma, via climbingamountainwithawolf)

motherjones:

likeafieldmouse:

Chad Wright - Master Plan (2013)

"For the first part of this series, Wright created a mould in the form of an L-shaped suburban dwelling, and set out a series of sand castles on his local beach. This scale-model suburbia was washed away by the tide, which perhaps urges us to consider the relative transience of so solid a symbol of the American dream, particularly since the 2007 subprime mortgage collapse. "

Artist’s statement: 

"In Master Plan, I am conflating a child’s sandcastle with architecture typifying postwar American suburbia. This three-part series culls artifacts from my childhood, investigating suburbia in its vision and legacy.Phase One focuses on the mass-produced tract house, re-examining it as symbol for the model American Dream.”

!

scienceyoucanlove:

Portuguese Man-of-War

Anyone unfamiliar with the biology of the venomous Portuguese man-of-war would likely mistake it for a jellyfish. Not only is it not a jellyfish, it’s not even an “it,” but a “they.” The Portuguese man-of-war is a siphonophore, an animal made up of a colony of organisms working together.

The man-of-war comprises four separate polyps. It gets its name from the uppermost polyp, a gas-filled bladder, or pneumatophore, which sits above the water and somewhat resembles an old warship at full sail. Man-of-wars are also known as bluebottles for the purple-blue color of their pneumatophores.

The tentacles are the man-of-war’s second organism. These long, thin tendrils can extend 165 feet (50 meters) in length below the surface, although 30 feet (10 meters) is more the average. They are covered in venom-filled nematocysts used to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. For humans, a man-of-war sting is excruciatingly painful, but rarely deadly. But beware—even dead man-of-wars washed up on shore can deliver a sting.

Muscles in the tentacles draw prey up to a polyp containing the gastrozooids or digestive organisms. A fourth polyp contains the reproductive organisms.

Man-of-wars are found, sometimes in groups of 1,000 or more, floating in warm waters throughout the world’s oceans. They have no independent means of propulsion and either drift on the currents or catch the wind with their pneumatophores. To avoid threats on the surface, they can deflate their air bags and briefly submerge.

source

first photo from wiki commons, second photo source

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

thedailywhat:

Infographic of the Day: The Literal Meaning of Every State Name in the United States

Check out the latest “North American” edition of the Atlas of True Names, a unique world mapping project that aims to chart the origin and history of the names of thousands of cities, states and rivers. Illustrated by American cartographers Stephan Hormes and Silke Peust, the recently released maps of the United States and Canada reveal that some names of cities and states translate more beautifully than others, such as Texas (Land of Friends) and New Mexico (New Navel of the Moon) in comparison to, say, Chicago (“Stinky Onion”)

#Maine

#Maine

#kinsmanridge #streeterpond #roadtrip #bikeride #clearmind

#kinsmanridge #streeterpond #roadtrip #bikeride #clearmind